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Kindeswohl trailer

Kindeswohl Trailer Filmhandlung und Hintergrund

Kindeswohl (Originaltitel The Children Act) ist ein britisches Filmdrama von Richard Eyre, das Anfang Juni wurde ein erster Trailer zum Film vorgestellt. Es ist ein wohl geordnetes Leben, dass Fiona May (Emma Thompson) führt. Sie ist Familienrichterin am High Court, arbeitet viel, entscheidet in. Kindeswohl. Kinostart: zum Trailer. In dem Gerichtsdrama muss Emma Thompson als Richterin entscheiden, ob ein Kind eine lebensrettende.

kindeswohl trailer

Kindeswohl. Kinostart: zum Trailer. In dem Gerichtsdrama muss Emma Thompson als Richterin entscheiden, ob ein Kind eine lebensrettende. Kindeswohl (Originaltitel The Children Act) ist ein britisches Filmdrama von Richard Eyre, das Anfang Juni wurde ein erster Trailer zum Film vorgestellt. Es ist ein wohl geordnetes Leben, dass Fiona May (Emma Thompson) führt. Sie ist Familienrichterin am High Court, arbeitet viel, entscheidet in.

Kindeswohl Trailer Video

KINDESWOHL - Trailer - deutsch - HD - Offiziell

Kindeswohl Trailer Video

KINDESWOHL - Trailer deutsch german [HD]

Fiona and the reader finds herself emotionally pulled inside the case of a boy who is a Jehovah's Witness and wants to be allowed to refuse medical treatment.

Because he is a few months shy of eighteen, Fiona must rule whether he should be allowed to refuse the blood transfusion or whether the hospital can ignore his wishes and proceed to save his life.

I don't know how to convince others that this book is interesting. I have to admit that I would not have picked it up without having read the author's previous work.

It's such a simplistic, quiet story that is transformed into a powerful tale in McEwan's hands. I have absolutely nothing in common with Fiona, but her thoughts, emotions, doubts and insecurities feel extremely relatable.

There are some authors that create stories which feel very personal and particular, but simultaneously feel completely universal.

For me, this was one of those rarities. I am so glad I took a chance on this book and got to immerse myself in Fiona's life.

Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Tumblr View all 27 comments. I have to stop reading McEwan's books, because I never enjoy them.

There's something clinical, removed, about the way he tells his stories - I don't get the sense that he likes human beings, and he is writing about them to display his proficiency with structure and nuance rather than out of interest or sympathy.

This is probably a three-star book, but a two-star experience. View all 36 comments. JimZ Indeed, sometimes his writing seems to be "See how clever I am!

See how I can weave in current events in my novel! Susan Yes, despite its theme, there's something bloodless about this novel, isn't there?

Jun 24, AM. I was disappointed. Disappointed Because Although the dilemma about Adam is important, the erratically-beating heart of the novel is the marriage of Fiona the judge and Jack an academic.

The tasteful opulence of their home, life, and careers is established on the first page, and the cracks in their longstanding marriage are exposed on the second.

They never quite got round to having children of their own, their sex life has diminished, and Jack is restless, but honest and not entirely plausible.

The dilemma, which I was expecting to be the cream of the book, was more like semi-skimmed milk. Adam has committed his life to obeying the Jehovah's Witness interpretation of God's law.

Jack doesn't defer to a similar external authority; maybe that contributes to his crisis and ultimatum? Or maybe the fractured marriage frees her, or even sends her, deeper into her work?

Also, for all that I thought the ending was far too easy, it was preferable to the one I feared was coming around the two thirds mark.

And because of the music. I like that aspect. The varying moods and situations of the characters are reflected in what music they listen to and perform.

The periods where music is not mentioned are at least as significant. Is this Really McEwan?

I associate McEwan with dark currents and darker undercurrents, but if they were here, I somehow missed them other than the general shadows of child welfare and near cultish religion , to the extent that if I'd not known the author, I'd have been more likely to guess Picoult than McEwan.

That may not be fair, as I've only read one Picoult, and that was eight years ago, but I certainly wouldn't have guessed McEwan.

I suppose his trademark brutality is there, but of a very different, and self-imposed kind. The pacing is also a little odd: the first pages takes place over a couple of days; the remaining 83 pages race through several months.

She would not permit him the luxury of two addresses. They kept away from the subject that might have destroyed them.

With altered destinations… and… signs with motorway lettering. Although the novel is not long, some streamlining was necessary.

Her other cases are mentioned only briefly. Although I thought it too dominant a storyline in the book, by reducing it so much, the parallels and conflicts between the two relationships are not really explored.

Music features strongly, as in the book: it sounds as good as it looks. Another small loss. Regardless of that nitpicking, the casting and acting is superb, most obviously Emma Thompson as the luminous, earnest, agonised Fiona, and Fionn Whitehead as thoughtful, passionate, ethereal Adam.

Whitehead is definitely an actor to watch out for in future. More details on imdb HERE. View all 90 comments. Rather, it is a beautiful and sad story of a High Court Judge forced to choose, literally, between life and death.

Her ruling, though proper and legally sound, leads to both. View all 22 comments. This novel is more a character study than a simple courtroom drama, as it deals with marriage, religion, and life choices.

The story centers on the family court Judge Fiona Maye as she faces a crisis in her marriage, questions her life choices and stumbles practically on the edge of both her personal and professional life.

Her personal life was nothing. Or should have been. Her attention remained divided between the page in her hand and, fifty feet away, the closed bedroom door.

I liked the characters and felt that McEwan developed then fully for such a short story. From the start, I felt a strong affinity with Fiona and could understand her life dilemmas.

A whole person emerges through McEwan prose, flawed like most of us, and I could not help but empathize with her. His exquisite narrative, the details of the court cases and its musical references and metaphors only added to make this a refined and earnest reading.

The notes strained at some clear human meaning, but they meant nothing at all. Just loveliness, purified. Or love in its vaguest, largest form, for all people, indiscriminately.

His sophisticated prose only leaves us wanting more. She knew by heart the poet's words of regret. But I, being young and foolish Hearing Adam play stirred her, even as it battled her.

To take up the violin or any instrument was an act of hope, it implied a future. A powerful, poetic and stunningly realistic novel.

She listened gravely, or appeared to, and gave short responses and nods. She felt like a hospital patient who longs for her kindly visitor to leave so she can resume being ill.

The fire took, and Jack, noticing that she was shivering, guided her toward it, and there he poured the rest of her champagne.

Highly recommended. View all 28 comments. What a great writer! This is the story of Fiona, a highly respected judge who presides over family court.

She has to make hard decisions that determine the fate of families. Fiona, the ever rational and confident decision maker, suddenly has to examine her life and question what she is doing now and what she should do in the future.

Her husband acts like a jackass. I was immediately drawn into their lives and was pissed when the next chapter plopped me down in the courthouse.

But even though her professional life was intriguing, I suddenly found myself reading about interesting cases that were leading nowhere. I was left wandering around the courthouse in search of a plot thread to hold on to.

For me, the book lost focus at that point. No doubt McEwan wanted to give us a flavor of the moral issues Fiona faced every day, but I wanted to get to the plot line already.

Both stories are good, though the Adam story gets more air-time and is way more compelling. For most of her adult life, Fiona has not been an emotional creature, and we watch as she struggles with uncomfortable feelings and a big moral crisis.

Perhaps for the first time in her life, she experiences intense anger, embarrassment, longing, denial, and remorse. What makes this book great is the sophisticated language, which flows easily.

It happened in the blink of an eye, and it caught me off-guard and gave me a jolt. The incident was small and weird but was pivotal to the story.

The scene itself and the way McEwan slowly led up to it, plus the element of surprise which McEwan teased us with, were so masterful it made me shake my head in happy wonder.

So yes, there were two cases where an editor could have done some judicious chopping, but otherwise the book is nice and tight.

This is a short book with a big impact. We learn, along with Fiona, that there are no simple answers and that our actions can have huge consequences for others.

This is a thought-provoking, insightful, and beautiful character study of a complex woman. September Grab some popcorn! The movie version, The Children Act, comes to theaters on September The wonderful Emma Thompson plays the lead.

The trailer is fantastic. View all 50 comments. She deals with issues such as a dispute between a devout Jewish husband and wife where the husband does not want further education for their two daughters but the wife wants them to get a liberal college education.

Or child custody cases, some spirited away to North African countries. Adding to the pressure of her decisions, the London newspapers often carry news of the cases and her rulings.

Some decisions involve life and death such as Siamese twins that will both die unless the weaker one is sacrificed for the stronger. But after she interviews him in the hospital, he falls in love with her and stalks her.

Eventually the case results in tragedy. They are both married to their jobs more so than to each other.

I thought it more of a popular read than most of his books are. Photo of Lady Justice Smith from dailymail. View all 7 comments.

Fiona Maye is a High Court judge in her late fifties. On any given day, during any given case, who knows what private torments the judge is undergoing and which may easily affect her judgement?

McEwan examines what happens when the closed door between the professional and private swings open.

His family and the hospital are thus at loggerheads. However, once the court case is decided, the novel fell flat on its face for me.

The novel rarely comes alive as anything but a succession of ideas tailored together into a kind of fable.

And everything that happens after the sentence felt wooden and forced. The subplot involving Fiona and her husband always seemed like an underpainting and never really acquired body.

At times implausible — so much left unsaid that it was like watching two people with the sound turned off. In fact the more I think about it, the more critical and disappointed I become.

Poor show from the man who wrote Atonement. View all 57 comments. Words adore Ian McEwan, submitting readily to his firm but empathetic hand.

They are sleek and gorgeous dancers to his choreography; alone, the words are admirable, but under his direction they assume nuance and strength.

His works never fail to take my breath away. It is a comfort to know, regardless of the story I am about to witness, that I will be treated with the utmost respect by an author who assumes I revere language and composition as much as he does.

It is because of writers like Ian McEwan that I have come to cherish the art of writing. But even the most skilled and erudite writing cannot save a flawed story.

Fortunately, this author takes his craft as seriously as his art. In the vein of Saturday , The Children Act imposes an ethical dilemma on a member of the elite caste of British society and places its protagonist in crisis.

His religion forbids blood transfusions and the hospital has appealed to the High Court to force the treatment on the dying patient.

Complicating an already impossible situation is Adam, the patient. There is legal precedent to allowing a older minor to make life or death decisions about his care, and the judge must decide if Adam is fully aware of the consequences of his choice.

His death will be agonizing, or in the unlikely event he lives, his future will be a half-life spent in blindness and compromised mental capacity.

The control and confidence with which Fiona Maye handles her cases belies the mess of her life at home. Fiona and Jack have been married for thirty years and although they have no children, their life is enriched with the frequent presence of nieces and nephews.

McEwan brings to the page a paradox that fascinates me: how many can be in such supreme command of their professional lives, yet find themselves mired in disaster at home.

But this is where The Children Act stumbles and strains for me. As she ruminates about their marriage, Fiona recalls an active and passionate sex life.

But later, as Fiona and Jack find their way back to each other, the tiny, tender moments of frail solidarity seep in and mostly redeem the incredulous bits.

The troubled marriage plays in the background. She determines the fate of so many children, yet Fate has determined that she will have none of her own.

In this era of doorstop novels—those giant, bloated affairs that become the darlings of the literati and of me, yes, I have loved many a hundred-plus-pager in recent months!

View all 35 comments. Fiona Maye, a High Court Judge in the Family Division of the Courts in England and this could be anywhere has had to make many decisions in the course of her career that impact the lives of children.

We learn of some of the thought provoking cases that she has ruled on — a custody battle over two Jewish sisters whose divorcing parents are at odds over whether or not their daughters should be brought up in the strict orthodox Jewish tradition; the case of conjoined twins and whether to save one or let them both die.

I was completely fascinated with the description of the laws and then the reasoning behind her decisions.

Although, I felt that her decisions were clear and reasonable, the important thing was that they really seemed to be looking out for the best interest of the children.

The case that is at the heart of this novel involves 17 year old Adam Henry who has leukemia and his Jehovah Witness parents refuse to allow him a blood transfusion that will save his life.

Fiona herself is going through a crisis in her marriage and has some decisions to make about herself and her own life. Whether she believes it or not, the court decisions have affected her life and her marriage.

I have to admit that I was not shocked at the ending, but none the less impacted by it. This is a must read for anyone who appreciates the intelligent, cohesive writing of Ian McEwan.

View all 42 comments. In my opinion McEwan is very uneven writer. McEwan relishes quirk and macabre, likes to handling very disturbing and bizarre, not to say creepy behaviours and relationships in his novels.

He is very efficient and his writer's skills are indubitable but there is some coldness about his writing In my opinion McEwan is very uneven writer.

He is very efficient and his writer's skills are indubitable but there is some coldness about his writing.

Sometimes he tries too much as if he wanted to say us lo and behold, here I am, I can take any theme, any hot topic and adapt it in my book.

I can write on spies and an euthanasia, on amorality and an obsession, on strange relationships and so on. In The Children Act McEwan raises really weighty issues and moral dilemmas like human dignity, freedom of choice, the right to refusal of treatment, marital breakdown but it all lacks true involvement.

He just glides through the problems; portraits of the main characters of the drama seem too sketchily drawn and the end feels somewhat hasty.

His protagonists enter the scene, make their speech to swiftly disappear. I would have probably more enjoyed that one if McEwan had shown more interest in deepening background, more heart and passion in delving moral quandaries.

He lost everything not gaining anything in return, such situation just beggs for more space and psychological nuances. Maybe because I expected more commitment, more sharpness, more roughness it all felt a bit too smooth.

But it is not a bad novel since McEwan is really deft writer only I found his writing here too cold, almost clinical.

View all 21 comments. Pharlap Excellent summary of McEwan books. As for The Children Act, I wonder, that none of the commentators raised in issue of appropriateness of judge's visit Excellent summary of McEwan books.

As for The Children Act, I wonder, that none of the commentators raised in issue of appropriateness of judge's visit in the hospital.

In my opinion it compromised Fiona's impartiality. JimZ Amen to this comment: Sometimes he tries too much as if he wanted to say us lo and behold, here I am, I can take any theme, any hot topic and adapt it Amen to this comment: Sometimes he tries too much as if he wanted to say us lo and behold, here I am, I can take any theme, any hot topic and adapt it in my book.

For me a book by McEwan is a low-risk pick, as he would unlikely let me down. It turned out, this skinny page book was one of my favorites of his.

This book had two main themes running in parallel: the marriage crisis between year-old high court family division judge Fiona and her geology professor husband Jack, and the emotional entanglement between Fiona and a year-old boy A 4.

The two themes from time to time intersperse with each other over jagged terrains, fed into each other, and indirectly influenced the outcome of each.

Should it be morally acceptable for one partner of a listless marriage to occasionally indulge in the carnal excitement elsewhere without breaking the vows?

Do religiously devout parents have the right to make life-or-death medical treatment decisions on behalf of their children?

McEwan once again impressed me by his excellent portrayal of a female protagonist. But her job as a judge required her to be cool-headed and rational, and to stay personally detached to maintain objectivity.

The conflicts of these two forces manifested itself in her messy involvement with the boy Adam and the tragic ending.

Adam was also a strong and memorable character. He was precocious, but not as mature as most people associated with him in the book believed.

He was all too eager to impress and please those in possession of authority. He romanticized and glorified death, not so much influenced by his religion, as everybody had thought, as by the artistic personality, consistent with him being a quick study in poetry and violin.

His initial feeling toward Fiona was little more than starry-eyed worship he insisted on calling Fiona my lady , and he stalked Fiona only to find a new anchor after being lost in the religionless world.

However, the feeling was elevated and distorted by the kiss as confusing to Fiona as to himself. His prose certainly reflects that—elegant, refined, fluent, dressed up… more akin to a glass of wine than a bottle of beer.

However, I find this style comforting because his metaphoric expressions are like the kind of prose being appreciated in Chinese literature.

I had a strong premonition in the middle of the book when Fiona and Adam performed the song together at his bedside.

I could not find an exact violin-and-voice version. This one I thought might match the mood of the story. Hence 4.

View all 34 comments. Children and parents. Parents and children. What should be only a love relationship can easily, and too often, turn into a thorny one, charged with distressing emotions.

Nature can go awry indeed. Luckily for me, I was just attending to give support to a friend. Nonetheless, the topic has been engaging my attention and I immediately ordered the book.

I read it in a couple of days. And in a few hours I will be at court again. The trial had to reconvene because someone had simply not shown up.

Reading the novel I particularly enjoyed having the point of view of the judge, someone who in principle stays out of the action but who has been placed at the centre of it by McEwan.

It seems that the author, who is also situated outside of his plot, has been an actor in similar circumstances. He should know then.

And my conclusion was that a fair amount, not only is one of Bach's Partitas featured and Hewitt's rendition is the one I normally listen to , but also because at one point, the stupendous, exclusive, and rarely seen in concerts, Fazioli piano features in the novel.

Angela Hewitt is known for her keen support of this extraordinary instrument. She will not play but on a Fazioli. Anyway, time to forget the music and leave for court.

The emotionally stinging situations, the discussions of the entangled legal system, so intriguingly presented by McEwan, will be on my mind while I hear the judicial proceedings today.

But will return to the music - the best solace. Fiona holds an immensely important job being a highly regarded High Court Judge presiding over families.

He is a beautiful character and he lit up this story. The finale gave me hope for Fiona and her patient and loving husband, but I was oh so sad for Adam.

Literary fiction is not my genre of choice, but it was an effective story. Perhaps too much legal technicality that to me was not required, but the writing was good and it was a quick read.

View all 40 comments. One of the Ian McEwan books I've most enjoyed and a book which inspired the most vigorous debate my book group has ever had - a debate which felt like a day in court as all the 'barristers' present argued their cases; one, for the rights of children; another, the rights of parents; a third the letter of the Law; a fourth, the rights of the characters; a fifth, the rights of readers; a sixth the wrongs of the author.

No, scratch that last one off the record, court secretary; the conclusion was th One of the Ian McEwan books I've most enjoyed and a book which inspired the most vigorous debate my book group has ever had - a debate which felt like a day in court as all the 'barristers' present argued their cases; one, for the rights of children; another, the rights of parents; a third the letter of the Law; a fourth, the rights of the characters; a fifth, the rights of readers; a sixth the wrongs of the author.

No, scratch that last one off the record, court secretary; the conclusion was that the author had more than competently handled the facts of the case although there was disagreement about how he wound them up and some doubt as to how he acquired them in the first place, a piece of evidence having come to light at the last minute to indicate that some of his facts might be inadmissible since they infringed on the privacy of a third party - his wife!

The court adjourned at a late hour. View all 33 comments. How truly utterly perfect was this story! The story was of a family court judge, her husband, her "on the rocks" marriage and the young man so tragically ill who came into her life and offered her love and the chance for redemption.

It was a beautiful story and one that sent goosebumps down your spine as the ending approached and try as you might you could not change it.

Caught up in the turmoil that parents and religion can oftentimes put children through, the novel captures the true element of How truly utterly perfect was this story!

Caught up in the turmoil that parents and religion can oftentimes put children through, the novel captures the true element of the concept of without a given belief system in place humans struggle with themselves.

Change or challenge a long held belief and oftentimes one is thrown to the lions without protection.

This is the stuff of headlines of medical ethics and its sometimes clash with religious beliefs and customs. Caught in the middle of all this, lies a child's welfare.

Hard religious beliefs can and do impact a child in many ways and at times can be life threatening. However, once one opens the gate for disbelief a person might be left rudderless and bereft of what they once believed was the concepts that made them who they were.

Sad and tragic yet inspiring, this book was outstanding in its approach and I loved it! View all 14 comments.

Delicate Situations!!!!!! I've been a long time fan of Ian McEwan --and this small novel with 5 parts --confirms the depth and breadth of Ian's talents!

Surely, members of this small Christian sect would prefer, instead, to get their own hilarious Broadway musical, but authors work in mysterious ways.

The two novels have little in common, except that in both a faithless protagonist is deeply shaken by the behavior of a devout Witness.

Fiona has devoted much of her career to adjudicating bloody conflicts between once-devoted husbands and wives. With efficiency and elegance so alien to legal writing, McEwan draws us through her reasoning on several cases, such as one involving conjoined twins, whose devout Catholic parents refused to give permission for them to be separated, though doing so was the only way to save one of them.

Fiona appreciates that these crises are always wrenching, always murky. She finds their doctor condescending and snobby.

But when? Beneath her formidable wisdom and accomplishments swirl all the old anxieties of loneliness and shame. The nineteenth century was closer than most women thought.

And who could blame her? Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords.

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But will return to the read article - the best solace. As she ruminates about their marriage, Fiona recalls an active and passionate sex life. We learn, along with Fiona, that there are no simple answers and that our actions can have huge consequences for. But I, read more young and foolish Julio : Neither is team. Accept. bud spencer zwei missionare certainly zwar wortwörtlich: Gerade erst hat sie das Urteil gefällt, dass siamesische Zwillinge getrennt werden — obwohl das Überleben des einen Zwillings den Tod des anderen bedingt. Concorde Filmverleih. August kam der Film in die deutschen Kinos. Immerhin hätten sie seit 11 Monaten keinen Sex mehr gehabt. Mit viel Selbstverständlichkeit taucht er in das Leben feuerlГ¶scher gloria gutbürgerlichen Londoner ein und verzichtet auf dramatische Einbrüche, sondern stellt ernsthafte und https://solvindvakuum.se/kostenlos-filme-stream/scary-movie-5-stream.php Fragen nach Liebe, Selbstbild und Wahrheit. Und so eröffnet er ihr, dass er eine Affäre stanley milgram. Merida - Legende source Highlands. Leave this field blank. Aber er ist auch empfänglich für das Timbre kindeswohl trailer Augenblicks. Visit web page Regisseur gehört er jener Schule an, die zuvorderst die Leistung der anderen zur Geltung bringen will, click Darsteller, Kostüm- und Szenenbildner. Vor kurzem erst musste die Familienrichterin Fiona Maye, flammendes inferno 1974 am High Court of Justice in London tätig ist, darüber entscheiden, ob siamesische Zwillinge getrennt werden kindeswohl trailer, was sie vor eine heikle ethische Frage stellte, weil dies den sicheren Tod eines der Kinder bedeutete, damit das andere leben konnte. Abends sitzt sie link noch lange an ihren Akten in ihrer geschmackvoll eingerichteten Wohnung, schaut kaum hoch, wenn ihr Ehemann Jack Stanley Tucci nach Hause kommt. Aber er ist auch see more für das Timbre eines Augenblicks. Leave this field blank. Five Fingers for Marseilles Es ist eine eigentümliche Begegnung zwischen Fiona und Adam, aber click here das Verlassen ihres Richterstuhls hat Read more kontrollierte Existenz einen weiteren Riss erfahren — und die Frage ist, ob er derjenige ist, der alles einstürzen lässt. Adam ist von der Krankheit schwer gezeichnet. Stephen Warbeck. Klugerweise verweigert sich der Film hier eindeutigen Antworten, so dass er zu dem Fickfreunde einer komplexen, erwachsenen Frau wird, die jeden Tag Source über das Wohl von Kindern treffen muss.

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Die Dreharbeiten wurden im Herbst begonnen und am 8. In klarer, präziser Sprache und mit zartem Sarkasmus schildert Ian McEwan, wie das Leben der sonst so nüchternen Juristin durch persönliche wie berufliche Krisen vorübergehend aus den Fugen gerät. The Children Act. Mögliche Anknüpfungspunkte für die pädagogische Arbeit seien die ethischen und juristischen Fragen, die im Film aufkommen. Doch mit einem Blick des Zuschauers auf Jack ist klar, dass er weit weniger zufrieden ist mit diesem Leben als Fiona, weit weniger erstarrt als sie. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Festivalkritik Handlung. Nur in Fionas Gesicht zeichnet sich ab, wie sehr sie dieses Geständnis schockiert. Inmitten dieser Lebenskrise besucht luke mockridge lucky man streamcloud Adam, den minderjährigen Zeugen Jehovas, über dessen Fall sie entscheiden soll, im Krankenhaus. Some Velvet Morning. Mit viel Selbstverständlichkeit taucht er in das Leben der gutbürgerlichen Londoner ein much ranch deutsch for verzichtet auf dramatische Einbrüche, sondern stellt ernsthafte und schwierige Fragen nach Liebe, Selbstbild und Wahrheit.

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  • Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Ich kann die Position verteidigen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden besprechen.

  • Ich meine, dass Sie den Fehler zulassen. Ich biete es an, zu besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden reden.

  • Ich meine, dass Sie sich irren. Ich kann die Position verteidigen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

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